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Healthful Dog

12/02/2015

Healthful Dog

The UK’s No 1 Holistic Pet Health Magazine

Showing the science behind Complementary and Alternative Medicine simply and arming Pet Owners with information to make them even bigger Pet Heroes.

Learn about natural modalities that can reduce veterinary visits by 85% (saving you money) and increase the health and longevity of your beloved pet by up to three times.

Our quarterly magazine features case studies and articles from holistic vets and alternative therapy practitioners, who write pieces on:-

  • Acupressure
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  • Animal Communication
  • Behaviour
  • Bowen Therapy
  • Feldenkrais Method
  • Flower Essences
  • Herbal Medicine
  • Homeopathy
  • Massage Therapy
  • Nutrition
  • Pet LossSubscribe
  • Tellington Touch
  • Vaccinosis
  • Zoopharmacognosy

We also feature book reviews, product reviews, events, articles on individual animals and particular health issues, have regular sections ‘Let’s talk…’ and ‘Spotlight on…’ as well as news from the pet industry and regular updates from one of the worlds’ most famous dogs.

Want your story published?

We include an ‘Owner Odyssey’ explaining the journey an individual owner took with their dog in order to improve health naturally, and if you have a tale which you think fits, we’d love to hear from you.

Our contributors show the science behind their processes, in order to increase the probability of conventional veterinary recognition.

Digital copies are available from our online store or subscribe here, paperbacks can be found on Amazon.

Some of our more contentious articles:-

spayneuterkibblecansCASD

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Youngevity Supplements

23/03/2018

We are pleased to bring you natural alternatives of nutritional supplements and other essentials.

Arthrydex

ArthryDex™ is a complete nutritional supplement with vitamins amino acids and enzymes formulated to support healthy bones and joints in small and large animals.

ArthryDex™ is a complete nutritional supplement with vitamins amino acids and enzymes formulated to support healthy bones and joints in small and large animals. SERVING RECOMMENDATIONS: For birds rodents and reptiles: use 1/4 scoop and sprinkle over food. For dogs cats and other animals up to 12 lbs: use 1/2 scoop. Animals 13 lbs to 24 lbs: give 3/4 scoop. Give 1 scoop per 25 lbs of animal’s weight. Larger animals such as horses or llamas: give 1/2 cup per feeding up to 3-4 cups per week.

CAUTION: For pets and ornamental animals only. Not for human consumption. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.

Ingredients: USP grade beef gelatin, defatted liver, brewer’s yeast, humic acid mineral blend (known to contain over 70 trace elements), Glucosamine Sulfate, YGY Digestive Enzyme Blend, This product contains no wheat, corn, soy, salt, sugar, dairy products, artificial colorings, flavoring or preservatives. Vitamin A, Riboflavin, Phosphorus, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Copper, Calcium, Vitamin E, Zinc, Iron, Vitamin B12, Selenium, Niacin, Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, Thiamin, Magnesium, Alanine, Histidine, Proline, Arginine, Isoleucine, Serine, Aspartate, Leucine, Threonine, Cysteine, Lysine, Tryptophan, Glutamate, Methionine, Tyrosine, Glycine, Phenylalanine, Valine, Amylase, Protease, Cellulase, Lipase, Lactase, Glucoamylase.

PerPETual

perPETual™ is an anti-aging canine supplement containing a powerful detox blend of botanicals that help them live a longer healthier life.

PerPETual™ is an all-natural beef flavored anti-aging canine supplement that can be given to dogs of all sizes. This chewable tablet contains a powerful proprietary detox blend of botanicals which may help extend a canines lifespan by protecting them from damaging free-radicals inflammation and other harmful stressors.

DIRECTIONS FOR DAILY USE: For dogs under 10 lbs: Use 1/2 tablet. Dogs 10-20 lbs: Use 1 tablet. 21-40 lbs: Use 2 tablets. 41-60 lbs: Use 3 tablets. 61+ lbs: Use 4 tablets.

Ingredients: Proprietary Anti-Aging Detox Blend containing: (Milk Thistle Seed Extract [80% silymarin], Ashwaganda Root Extract [1.5% withanolides], Bacopa Herb Extract [20% bacosides], Green Lipped Mussel, Green Tea Leaf Extract [95% phenols/70% catechins/45% EGCG], Turmeric Root Extract [95% curcumin], Plant Derived Trace Minerals), Beef Liver, Chicken Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Fish Flavor, Magnesium Stearate, Silicon Dioxide, Stearic Acid, Whey.

FTO – Odor-B-Gone

Natural Urine Odor & Stain Eliminator – This natural, bio-enzymatic cleaning formulation was created to speed up the natural biodegradation of any organic related stain or odor. It is a 3 in 1 product! 1) It cleans your dog or cat’s urine/fecal stain. 2) It then uses lives enzymes to remove the stain. 3) It deodorizes, leaving a fresh scent. 11 oz.

Finally, a natural product that’s safe for your pets, yourself and even your kids! Sta-Sound’s Odor-B-Gone Urine Odor & Stain Eliminator is the simplest solution when it comes to eliminating urine and fecal odors as well as the pesky stains that come with them! Apply a liberal amount to the affected area and watch nature in action as the enzymes and beneficial bacteria clean, remove and deodorize the stains, leaving happy owners and pets alike!

Ingredients: Water, Biological Blend, Nonionic Surfactant, Fragrance, Polystyrene.

FTO – Pest B Gone for Dogs 16 oz. Spray

Natural Flea & Tick Spray – Long lasting flea & tick control. Say goodbye to all those pesky bugs. Sta-Sound Pest-B-Gone is the simplest solution. It’s also effective on mosquitoes and flies!

Finally, an all-natural product that’s safe for your pets, yourself, and even your kids! Sta-Sound’s Pest-B-Gone for dogs uses only the best all-natural ingredients – no harsh chemicals or dangerous poisons. Pest-B-Gone is safe for the whole family to use. It’s a win-win for pets and owners alike!

Ingredients: Purified Water, Cloveleaf Oil, Sassafrass Oil, Cinnamon Oil, Citronella Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Lemongrass Oil, Geraniol Oil, Tea Tree Oil, Sage Oil, Ginger Oil, Fragrance Preservative Veterinarian Approved Waterless Smells Great Botanical Product Great for the Dog Owner On the Go

Outdoor Buzz Mist

Keep irritating bugs off your dog, while you enjoy the outdoors with our For Tails Only™ Outdoor Buzz Mist.

For Tails Only™ Outdoor Buzz is specially-crafted to help keep irritating bugs away from your pet. Made with Plant Derived Minerals™, essential oil distillate waters, and pure essential oils, this spray safely helps keep bugs away.

Ingredients: Plant Derived Minerals, Dead Seat Salt, Roman Chamomile Distillate Water, Yarrow (Milfoil) Distillate Water, Witch Hazel Distillate Water, Cedar Leaf Essential Oil, Cypress Essential Oil, Elemi Essential Oil, Geranium Essential Oil, Citronella Essential Oil.

Calming Mist

Help your dog relax and bring their energy levels down with our For Tails Only™ Calming Mist.

For Tails Only™ Calming Mist is specially-crafted to gently help your pet relax and bring their energy levels down. Made with Plant Derived Minerals™ and essential oil distillate waters, these mists will safely provide your pet with a calming experience.

Ingredients: Plant Derived Minerals, Dead Seat Salt, Sandalwood Distillate Water, Orange Blossom Distillate Water, Lavender Distillate Water, Rosemary Distillate Water, Lavender Essential Oil, Rosemary-1,8 Cineol Essential Oil.

 Travel Mist

Make every trip enjoyable for your dog with our For Tails Only™ Travel Mist.

For Tails Only™ Travel Mist is a calming blend that will help provide your pet with a pleasant traveling experience. Made with Plant Derived Minerals™, essential oil distillate waters, and pure essential oils, this mist will make traveling enjoyable for your pet.

Ingredients: Plant Derived Minerals, Dead Seat Salt, Roman Chamomile Distillate Water, Rose Distillate Water, Lavender Distillate Water, Lavender Essential Oil, Geranium Essential Oil.

FTO – Dog-B-Clean™ Natural Waterless Shampoo

Happy coat, happy dog! Keep your dog shiny and clean with this great-smelling, natural waterless shampoo! Just spray on your dog, then pet or brush it through. No messy bathtub or angry animal aftermath. Your dog will be feeling and smelling clean in no time! 16 oz.

Don’t kid yourself, dogs hate baths, and dog owners hate messy bathtubs and smelling like wet dog. If you want to bathe your dog anytime, anywhere without all the fuss, then Dog B-Clean is for you! Enjoy the fresh scents of pomegranate and mango as you pet your dog clean. Just spray Dog B-Clean on your dog’s coat or on your hands, then pet your dog. That’s it! You and your dog will love Dog B-Clean, and you’ll both smell fantastic!

Ingredients: Purified Water, Mild Surfactant Blend, Fragrance, Citric Acid, Preservative, Dye. • Veterinarian Approved • Waterless • Smells Great • Botanical Product • Great for the Dog Owner On the Go

FTO – Breath B-Clean™ Canine Breath Foam

Knocks out bad breath fast! Simply squirt the minty breath foam onto your dogs teeth and gums to control bad breath. 8 oz

Finally a canine breath product that REALLY works! If you’re tired of chasing your dog around the house with a toothbrush only to get bit or wasting money on unchewed Greenies, then Sta-Sound Breath-B-Clean is the answer!All it takes is a little squirt into the corner of your dog’s mouth, and you’ll both be loving his minty, clean breath in no time. Because Breath-B-Clean only uses top-quality ingredients, if you forget your own toothbrush, you can give yourself a pump for a quick freshener!

Ingredients: Water, Preservatives, Stevia, Aloe Vera Juice, Flavors – Peppermint and Spearmint, Glycerin Veterinarian Approved Waterless Smells Great Botanical Product Great for the Dog Owner On the Go

FTO – Odor B-Gone™ Litter Box Odor Eliminator

Sta-Sound’s Odor-B-Gone is the simplest solution when it comes to eliminating feline urine and fecal odors and keeping your cat happy. It mixes easily with all types of litter. Say goodbye to unpleasant odors and hello to a clean and natural Odor-B-Gone litter box. Used to absorb odors and liquid from litter boxes, animal carriers and more. 11 oz

Even if you and your cat have gotten used to the smell of a litter box in your house, your friends and family can smell it the instant they walk through the door. Avoid the embarrassment with Sta-Sound’s Odor-B-Gone! Odor-B-Gone mixes with all types of litter, and the natural, non-abrasive granules are easy on your cat. The long-lasting freshness will help you breathe a little easier.

Ingredients: Proprietary blend of nontoxic and biodegradable ingredients in a corn cob base. Veterinarian Approved Waterless Smells Great Botanical Product Great for the Cat Owner On the Go

FTO – Cat B-Clean™ Natural Waterless Shampoo

Happy coat, happy cat! Keep your cat shiny and clean with this great-smelling, natural waterless shampoo! Just spray on your hands, then pet or brush it through. No messy bathtub or angry animal aftermath. Your cat will be feeling and smelling clean in no time! 16 oz.

Are you tired of getting clawed every time you try to give your cat a bath? Stop fighting your cat, and start delighting your cat with Cat B-Clean It’s so easy! All you have to do is spray Cat B-Clean on your hands or cat, then simply pet until clean. No more angry cat, and you both end up smelling great! Cat B-Clean entices with the sweet scent of pomegranate and mango. It also uses the best natural ingredients, making it safe for kitty and for the whole family.

Ingredients: Purified Water, Mild Surfactant Blend, Fragrance, Citric Acid, Preservative, Dye.

FTO – Pest B Gone for Cats 16 oz. Spray

Natural Flea & Tick Spray – Long lasting flea & tick control. Say goodbye to all those pesky bugs. Sta-Sound Pest-B-Gone is the simplest solution. It’s also effective on mosquitoes and flies!

Finally, an all-natural product that’s safe for your pets, yourself, and even your kids! Just because your cat lives indoors, doesn’t mean they’re pest-free. The good news is Sta-Sound’s Pest-B-Gone is gentle enough to use as a maintenance product because it’s all natural and non-toxic. Simply spray it on your hands, then pet your cat. You will both appreciate how easy it is to protect your feline friend from those pesky bugs like fleas, ticks and even mosquitoes. Sta-Sound’s Pest-B-Gone for cats uses only the best, all-natural ingredients – no harsh chemicals or dangerous poisons. Pest-B-Gone is safe for the whole family to use. It’s a win-win for pets and owners alike!

Ingredients: Purified Water, Cloveleaf Oil, Sassafrass Oil, Cinnamon Oil, Citronella Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Lemongrass Oil, Geraniol Oil, Tea Tree Oil, Sage Oil, Ginger Oil, Fragrance Preservative Veterinarian Approved Waterless Smells Great Botanical Product Great for the Cat Owner On-the-Go

Lets Talk… Puppuccino

17/03/2018

Starbucks have a non-menu item for our pets,

an espresso shot sized cup of whipped cream, and it’s FREE!

What could be better?

Especially seeing as we’ve been learning to ‘up the fats’ in our pets diet, right.

Well, no.

As soon as you look at the actual ingredients, you may think twice:

  • Cream
  • Milk
  • Mono and Diglycerides: stabilizers
  • Carrageenan

Thankfully Susan Thixton of Truth About Pet Food has already researched this last ingredient and written about it in Dog Naturally Magazine.

There are two types of Carrageenan, unfortunately ’human grade’ has yet to be established as ’free from potentially cancer-causing material’, and is known to induce inflammation (Tobacman, 2001) more worryingly it’s been shown to do this particularly to intestinal epithelial cells (Bhattacharrya et al. (2007) and in fact kills those cells (Bhattacharyya et al. 2008). It’s also been shown to inhibit insulin signalling (Bhattacharyya et al. 2015) and has been linked to cancer and diabetes (Cornucopia Institute, 2016) what’s worse is that this is not news as has been known since at least 1971 (Rosa et al.)

So, will you take the risk?

 

Refs:

Bhattacharyya S, Borthakur A, Pant N, Dudeia P, Tobacman JK (2007) Bcl10 mediates LPS-induced activation of NF-κB and IL-8 in human intestinal epithelial cells. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 293:G429–G437

Bhattacharyya S, Borthakur A, Dudeja PK, Tobacman JK (2008) Carrageenan induces cell cycle arrest in human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. J Nutr 138:469–475

Bhattacharyya S, Feferman L, Tobacman JK (2015) Carrageenan inhibits insulin signaling through GRB10-mediated decrease in Tyr(P)-IRS1 and through inflammation-induced increase in Ser(P)307-IRS1. J Biol Chem 290:10764–10774

Cornucopia Institute (2016). Carrageenan, new studies reinforce link to inflammation, cancer and diabetes. https://www.cornucopia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/CarageenanReport-2016.pdf [retrieved on 16-Jan-2017]

Rosa et al. (1971) Studies of the mediators of the acute inflammatory response induced in rates in different sites by carrageenan and turpentine. The Journal of Pathology  10.1002\path.1711040103
Tobacman, J.K. (2001) Review of harmful gastrointestinal effects of carrageenan in animal experiments. Environmental Health Perspectives 109(10):983-994 [Internet] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1242073/

Turner, H. B. (2017) Lets Talk… Puppuccino Healthful Dog 4[4]:249

Lets Talk… Legumes

15/03/2018

H B Turner

Legumes are defined as ‘members of the pea family’ 

Legumes: Beans, Peas, Lentils, Soy and Peanuts

Legumes contain Phytic Acid which binds to nutrients in food preventing their absorption, earning them the label ‘anti-nutrients’, the knock on effects of this is highly dependent on intake quantity. Legumes also contain galaco-ligosaccharides which are associated with digestive issues. However, the main issue with legumes is their lectin content.

Lectins are known to damage the intestinal wall by reducing the speed of cell renewal, which leads to ‘leaky gut’, this causes digestive issues, specifically with vitamin and mineral absorption and autoimmune problems. Lectins are a plant form of defence that are resistant to digestion and lead to antibody production to them, which means certain lectin containing foods can literally be intolerable to a body, stimulating an immune response i.e. allergic reaction, and too much lectin consumption leads to vomiting, cramping and diarrhoea. Immune responses include skin rashes, joint pain and general inflammation, thankfully these will stop, as soon as consumption stops.

Legumes are also high in starch, which we know turns to sugar during the digestive process and feeds insulin resistance, weight gain and cancer.

Peanuts (unless you’ve picked them yourself) contain the FDA declared “unavoidable contaminant” aflatoxins, long-term consumption of which are linked to cancer and other diseases.

Soy, ignoring the fact that 93% of soy produced is GMO, as well as containing lectins and phytic acid which inhibit calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and zinc absorption, also contain phytoestrogens, which are hormone disruptors linked with infertility and some forms of cancer. Soy also contains trypsin inhibitors which have a negative effect on protein digestion and increase the bodies need for vitamins B12 and D, as well as a clot-promoting substance called Haemagglutin, which causes red blood cells to clump together, that can be painful and lead to health issues. Its isoflavones have been shown to stimulate growth of cancer cells, its aluminium content is connected to kidney and nervous system issues and soys high levels of goitrogens block the production of thyroid hormone.

Unfortunately the pet food industry have adopted a number of legumes as ‘protein sources’ instead of the species appropriate protein source meat. i.e. soy in ‘cat food’ (those meaty pieces) and ‘pea protein’ in kibble, also peanut husks are used as a source of fibre.

There are a number of ways that lectins can be processed that reduce the negative effects, such as sprouting and fermenting, however these processes are costly and not normally utilised in ‘pet food’ or even in home preparation.

Bearing all of this in mind you can possibly see why personally I recommend against feeding legumes, and in fact other than the odd handful of peanuts or spoonful of hummus, I don’t eat them myself (thankfully coffee beans are not legumes lol).

 

Spotlight on…. To Cook, or Not to Cook, that is the Question.

01/03/2018

cooked

H B Turner

The quality of a proteins primary structure has an effect on its nutritional value and functionality upon gastrointestinal digestion (Yu et al. 2016) Cooking ‘denatures proteins, which destroys both the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, disrupting the normal alpha-helix and beta sheets in a protein and uncoiling it into a random shape (Elmhurst University N.D.) it also effects colour (Suman & Joseph, 2013). Tenderness (Christensen et al. 2000) and gelation (Sun and Holley, 2011).

Cooking meat (to an internal temperature of 75 +/- 3 C) has an ACE inhibitory effect due to a higher thiol content (Simonetti et al, 2016) —ACE inhibitors reduce blood pressure and can lead to kidney failure, allergic reaction, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, decreased white blood cells and angioedema. In fact cooked meat fed to animals has shown to contribute to pathogenesis of degenerative diseases including:

  • Diabetes (Cai et al. 2012)
  • Hepatic and renal fibrosis (Li et al. 2014)
  • Increased advanced glycation end products (AGEs), linked to diabetes and cardiovascular disease, decreased renal function and structural changes such as progressive nephropathies glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy.(Poulsen et al. 2013)
  • Increased free radicals, decreased antioxidants increasing protein oxidation and increasing ageing (Soladoye et al, 2015)
  • Increases ageing and age related diseases (Estevez and Luna, 2016)

Interestingly whilst digestibility is lower in overcooked meat, it has a higher ‘protein’ level (Oberli et al, 2016), which would be listed on the proximate analysis of kibble and canned goods, however, the ageing and age related disease creating effects of cooked meats are increased when combined with sugars (found in the starches needed to form kibble and used as a filler).

The fresher the better

When death occurs and circulation ceases lactic acid is produced and pH lowers until glycolytic enzymes become denatured. Once the ATP used for these processes is gone rigor mortis sets in, degrading proteins (Yu et al. 2016), therefore the longer the meat has been dead, the more degraded the proteins, this means that your 21 day hung steak is tender, but has already been denatured by the degradation process. Carnivores in the wild eat quickly, possibly in order to consume the meat prior to it’s nutritional value being depleted.

Three dimensional denaturation

1) Sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins denature at 40 to 52.5°C

2) Loss of fluid from myofibres occurs at 52.5-60°C

3) Partial of complete gelatinixation of collagen at 64-94°C

The effects on the three levels of structural integrity vary dependent on the way the proteins are cooked and the temperature reached, however in general proteins start to denature at 40°C/105.4F, amino acid levels are also negatively effected, as are enzymes efficiencies, Tryptophan, Tyrosine, Phenylalanine  etc. leading to incomplete digestion.

A massive increase in protein carbonyls occurs which modifies histadine, cysteine and lysine and is also known as oxidative stress, and ammonia release increases with temperature/cooking time.

Reading hundreds of papers on the effect of cooking on proteins, from milk to meat, the resultant denaturing, loss of nutrients and ageing effect, it’s not difficult to see how kibble and canned pet food, which is cooked at very high temperatures of long periods of time and potentially under pressure (extrusion process) which increases the loss of nutrients, is leading to our pets getting age related diseases younger and younger in life, and that it is negatively effecting lifespan.  The data is quite clear on that as over a 10 year period a 71% shift to kibble reduced the average age at which a dog is considered ‘geriatric’ from 8.85 to 7, and increased the average vet bill by 410%.

However, when you take into account that our simple processes of obtaining meat, and the delays that occur from death to plate also have an effect, it seems even more important that the food we provide our pets is as fresh and raw as possible for optimum nutrition.
This information is not new, in fact Francis M. Pottenger did his 10 year study on Cats  between 1932 and 1942, and that was raw compared to cooked to the same level that we humans cook our food (Pottenger, 1983). His study clearly showed that carnivores fed cooked diets were more susceptible to parasites, suffered chronic diseases, generationally increased deformities and infertility.  What the science does do is break the information down and prove Pottengers findings.

In conclusion, whilst cooking increases aroma & palatability for people, it is neither species appropriate or recommended for our pets, as it reduces protein quality, nutrient density & increases consumer ageing & age related diseases.

 

References:
Cai W, Ramdas M, Zhu L, Chen X, Striker GE, Vlassara H. 2012. Oral advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) promote insulin resistance and diabetes by depleting the antioxidant defenses AGE receptor-1 and sirtuin 1. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA109:15888–93.

Christensen M, Ertbjerg P, Failla S, Sañudo C, Richardson RI, Nute GR, Olleta JL, Panea B, Albertí P, Juárez M, Hocquette J-F, Williams JL. 2011. Relationship between collagen characteristics, lipid content and raw and cooked texture of meat from young bulls of fifteen European breeds. Meat Sci 87:61–5. Elmhurst University (N.D.) Denaturation of Proteins [Internet]  http://chemistry.elmhurst.edu/vchembook/568denaturation.html (accessed 20/12/2017)

Estévez M, Luna C. 2016. Dietary protein oxidation: a silent threat to human health? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr doi: 10.1080/10408398.2016.1165182. in press.

Li ZL, Mo L, Le G, Shi Y. 2014. Oxidized casein impairs antioxidant defense system and induces hepatic and renal injury in mice. Food Chem Toxicol 64:86–93.

Oberli M, Lan A, Khodorova N, Santé-Lhoutellier V, Walker F, Piedcoq J, Davila A-M, Blachier F, Tomé D, Fromentin G, Gaudichon C. 2016. Compared with raw bovine meat, boiling but not grilling, barbecuing, or roasting decreases protein digestibility without any major consequences for intestinal mucosa in rats, although the daily ingestion of bovine meat induces histologic modifications in the colon. J Nutr 146:1506–13. Poulsen MW, Hedegaard RV, Andersen JM, de Courten B, Bügel S, Nielsen J, Skibsted LH, Dragsted LO. 2013. Advanced glycation endproducts in food and their effects on health. Food Chem Toxicol 60:10–37.

Pottenger, F.M. (1983) Potenger’s Cats—A Study in Nutrition. Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation

Simonetti A, Gambacorta E, Perna A. 2016. Antioxidative and antihypertensive activities of pig meat before and after cooking and in vitro gastrointestinal digestion: comparison between Italian autochthonous pig Suino Nero Lucano and a modern crossbred pig. Food Chem 212:590–5.

Soladoye OP, Juárez ML, Aalhus JL, Shand P, Estévez M. 2015. Protein oxidation in processed meat: mechanisms and potential implications on human health. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 14:106–22.

Suman SP, Joseph P. 2013. Myoglobin chemistry and meat color. Annu Rev Food Sci Technol 4:79–99.

Sun XD, Holley RA. 2011. Factors influencing gel formation by myofibrillar proteins in muscle foods. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 10:33–51.

Yu, T. Morton, J.D. Clerens, S. Dyer, J.M. (2016) Cooking-Induced Protein Modifications in Meat. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety. 16[1]:141-159

 

RCVS and CAM

08/11/2017

On Thursday 2 November 2017 the RCVS Council approved a new position statement on the veterinary use of complementary and alternative medicines, including homeopathy.

The statement is as follows:

“We have recently been asked questions about complementary and alternative medicines and treatments in general and homeopathy in particular.

“We would like to highlight our commitment to promoting the advancement of veterinary medicine upon sound scientific principles and to re-iterate the fundamental obligation upon our members as practitioners within a science-based profession which is to make animal welfare their first consideration.

“In fulfilling this obligation, we expect that treatments offered by veterinary surgeons are underpinned by a recognised evidence base or sound scientific principles. Veterinary surgeons should not make unproven claims about any treatments, including prophylactic treatments.

“Homeopathy exists without a recognised body of evidence for its use. Furthermore, it is not based on sound scientific principles. In order to protect animal welfare, we regard such treatments as being complementary rather than alternative to treatments for which there is a recognised evidence base or which are based in sound scientific principles. It is vital to protect the welfare of animals committed to the care of the veterinary profession and the public’s confidence in the profession that any treatments not underpinned by a recognised evidence base or sound scientific principles do not delay or replace those that do.”

Here is the response from the BAHVS:

We are deeply disappointed that the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) has chosen to step outside its remit and make such an ill-considered and misinformed statement regarding Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) in general, and Homeopathy in particular.

The RCVS mission statement is “Setting, upholding and advancing the educational, ethical and clinical standards of Veterinary Surgeons and Veterinary Nurses” In making this statement on CAM the RCVS fails its mission on so many levels, but in particular when one considers ethics.

The RCVS failed to consult at all with stakeholders actually involved in CAM, despite representations to be so consulted, before considering and issuing their statement. This failure is contrary to the usual manner in which the RCVS conducts itself.

It is commonly accepted that it is not the role of a regulator to seek to influence clinical judgement nor to resolve differences of scientific opinion. The RCVS has stated many times that it does not get involved. Yet the current RCVS Council has seemingly, willingly, allowed itself to be seduced by a belief-based irresponsible diatribe from a vocal minority into a precedent-setting restriction of the clinical freedoms the profession has always enjoyed. In doing so it has ignored advice from its own advising committees and it has embarked on a course that will stifle future innovation, research and evolution of new treatment modalities.

It is perhaps no coincidence that it should do so when there is an explosion of interest in CAM, including Homeopathy, in the agricultural sector where the drive is to reduce and replace dependence on antibiotics in light of Antibiotic Resistance (AMR) concerns, and some of the most successful methods so far are proving to be those defined as CAM. It is fact that some of the largest “conventional” veterinary practices in the UK dealing with animal production for food are the ones leading the way on this, seeking out treatments as “alternative”, and Homeopathy is proving one of the successful modalities. In singling out the issue of prophylactic treatments – the very use of CAM for which in agriculture significantly threatens the finances of the Pharmaceutical Industry – the RCVS puts itself into a position where it can be accused of putting profits before probity, and corporations before conscience – or is it just naïve and completely out of touch?

The RCVS statement and the associated debates, have created a moral imperative for many mainstream practices of the profession to be publicly examined in detail. We are sure over the coming weeks, months and years there will be uncomfortable times ahead for all branches of the profession. It is just not acceptable for the mainstream body of vets to claim the moral high ground when the evidence base for much of Veterinary Science is poor at best. There is plenty of evidence of poor and demonstrably harmful practices ignored in the modern corporate world in favour of targets and profitability. Industry business journals even run articles on “mining” the best clients for cash.

History tells us that to question the RCVS and the status quo is a dangerous path. In making the statement as it has, regarding CAM in general and Homeopathy in particular, the RCVS has shown its lack of consideration for those affected. This includes those who own and care for animals where their freedom of choice may be restricted. What of patients already on treatments they may now be denied? There is no published impact assessment or route to compensation for those whose practices are now suffering.  In creating a complainant’s charter, the RCVS Council must accept that it needs to face up to questions of its own. It is arguably now complicit in deception of the public, which its very existence is meant to protect.

So what of the evidence argument against CAM? There is in fact very good evidence for much of CAM, including and especially Homeopathy, with many peer-reviewed papers in a number of Journals. However, these papers are routinely ignored by the establishment as they are published in CAM journals. This is bizarre when one considers that a parasitologist will publish in a journal of parasitology, a pharmacist in a journal of pharmacology, so why not a homeopath in the journal “Homeopathy”?

A level playing field regarding evidence it is not. The bar is raised so high by the RCVS for CAM that it can never compete. Funding for research has been historically blocked by bodies such as the BVA. When the mainstream journals are sponsored by Big Pharma and other vested interests, so that Editors dare not publish CAM papers, it is unfair and corrupt to criticise CAM in this way. The RCVS’s own Science Committee in this debate noted that the evidence base for a number of accepted “conventional” treatments is lacking so why pick on CAM, which has as good if not better in place, and is not subject to the same fallacies that can contaminate the most prestigious journals when researcher and publisher bias and fraud are led by the money men?

Clients actively seek out CAM therapies for their animals as conventional medicines regularly fail or produce unacceptable side effects. Homeopathy has previously been recognised in the RCVS register as having a specialist qualification (it still does), and is independently examined and regulated, which is perhaps why it attracts the most ire of the CAM options. Homeopathy is in fact provided for in UK and EU Legislation. It is required to be available, cannot be banned without a change in the Law, and it behoves the profession to embrace it, even if in the minority.

A witch-hunt has been conducted on an unprecedented scale in the profession. This has been aided by the support on social media of some Past Presidents of the RCVS and BVA, RCVS Council members and by the profession’s media chiefs. It is time for it to stop. It discredits those making and supporting the attacks on colleagues, discredits the profession and, by disseminating false conclusions to the media, adds to the growing and damaging public distrust of science and of our profession.

The RCVS sits at the very core of our profession. It has to be the ethical face of the profession and has to set an example to the profession. In this case it falls far short of the high standard it should project.

In making such a statement as it now has, the RCVS has lost all credibility in the Evidence Based Medicine debate, and has eschewed the moral integrity required to regulate the profession. Its statement should be withdrawn immediately. 5th November 2017.

All at Healthful Dog specialise in Complementary Therapies, we publish this magazine to raise awareness about the advantages of Holistic treatments and detail the science behind them. We are more than disappointed with the RCVS’ current decision/opinion.

There is plenty of science backing homeopathy, in fact Hahnemann himself performed thorough scientific experiments whilst developing his Materia Media and we’ve witnessed where it has proven far superior to the capabilities of conventional veterinary practice.  We therefore back the BAHVS 100% and will continue to educate pet owners on alternative ways to treat the cause of disease as well as increasing standard of living and longevity naturally.

 Please Join the Movement:                   Freedom of Medical Choice

Please sign the petition: https://www.thepetitionsite.com/219/768/240/we-need-to-stop-the-rcvs-from-banning-homeopathic-vets-from-treating-animals/?taf_id=45173133&cid=fb_na

We also support the ‘PostCard’ Campaign launched by Canine Health Concern  Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/50163890984/

References:

RCVS College publishes complementary medicines statement [Internet] (Accessed 08/11/2017) https://www.rcvs.org.uk/news-and-views/news/college-publishes-complementary-medicines-statement/

BAHVS Statement of the British Association of Homeopathic Veterinary Surgeons in response to the RCVS Statement of 3rd November 2017 as regards Complementary and Alternative Medicines [Internet] (Accessed 08/11/2017) http://www.bahvs.com/rcvs-statement/

Online advice – is it trustworthy?

26/10/2017

As a Canine Nutritionist who tailored 4 yrs at University in order to be qualified I find myself disappointed at people listening to advice from people who don’t actually know what they’re talking about: as do my colleagues.

Here is a prime example…


Thankfully the poster questioned the person claiming to be qualified.

Be aware that there are a great deal of courses available online that have either no accreditation at all, or teach biased misinformation or even both.

When it comes to pet nutrition it is my personal opinion that anyone not attempting to teach you to feed a raw/fresh species appropriate diet isn’t coming from a place of knowledge.

Those nutritionists that I respect have tons of books, the most important of which is the NRC book (most prominent here)


If your ‘nutrient advice’ is coming from someone who doesn’t own a copy, or hasn’t even heard of it, their advice is questionable.

Please be aware that not all advice is good, please do your research.

Of those that are highly prominent in the industry, we recommend :

Raw Feeding Veterinary Society

Dr. Ian Billinghurst

Dr. Karen Becker

Rodney Habib

ANNAHP Members

And a small number of nutritionists over and above those that contribute to our awesome magazine. These people are often too busy to be answering every question in a chat group.

Please be wary of bad advice and remember, just because someone has been doing something for years, it doesn’t mean they’ve got it right.

“Experts built the Titanic”

Summer = Parasite Season

15/07/2017

What do we mean by that? Well Ticks & Fleas are around all year round, but their numbers are at their highest now.

Of course ultimate health from optimum balance of digestible nutrition reduces the risk of parasites, but it cannot be 100%.

Ticks

 Ticks cause irritation, they can lead to abscesses and we know they carry Lyme disease (Borreliosis)

Fleas

Fleas also cause itching and irritation, large numbers can lead to anaemia and they carry worms.

Worms

Worm burden can cause all sorts of problems, most notably dependent on the type worm, the health and age of the individual, and the number reproducing in the system. Whilst roundworm, the most common, can be passed on via maternal milk & though fecal matter, fleas carry tape worm & slugs carry heart worm.

As we do not recommend pharmaceutical neurotoxins, what do we recommend?

VermX is a natural, herbal way to deal with worms

Ingredients: Cinnamon, Garlic, Common Thyme, Peppermint, Fennel, Cleavers, Nettle, Slippery Elm, Quassia, Elecampane

TickHex to prevent Ticks

Ingredients: Neem Oil, HexCaliber (Organic Essentials Oil Blend), Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, (Household Spray contains Polysorbate 80)

&

FleaHex to prevent Fleas

Ingredients: Castile Soap, Organic Coconut Oil, Neem Oil, HexCaliber (Organic Essentials Oil Blend), Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, (Spray contains Polysorbate 80)